Does Narcan Offer Opiate Users A False Sense Of Security?

At least 17 states in America, as well as first responders in the District of Columbia, have been trained to publicly administer the heroin overdose antidote called Narcan, and at least 10 states allow for prescriptions to family or friends of drug users who worry that they will lose their loved one to addiction. While the drug has saved an estimated 10,000 lives, many officials are wary of its use, saying that an increase in its availability is causing public health problems. Officials in New Castle, Pennsylvania say the drug is giving users a false sense of, giving them the confidence to engage in more risky behavior with the belief that when they overdose, they'll be brought back from death. While inarguably, the drug, recently approved for first responders in New Castle, saves lives. But the city has also seen its share of “repeat offenders” – drug addicts that overdose on opiates multiple times in a week, and sometimes, more than one time a day, causing concern and frustration…

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One of Many Overdose Deaths

Tyler Macleod was a young man that was well-liked by everyone and had a full life ahead of him. Unfortunately, will never have the future he deserves thanks to an addiction to heroin that took his life. Everyone wanted to be Tyler's friend, he was fun loving and loved the beaches and surfing. During adolescence, Tyler started experiencing symptoms of depression and began smoking marijuana. His parents tried to help him by transferring him to a new school but that did not keep the addiction from growing. After receiving a phone call from a school counselor that informed his parents that he was using harder drugs, Tyler's parents took him to drug rehab program and made him attend narcotics anonymous meetings daily. This helped for a while but soon his parents started to find foil and needles which made them know that he was smoking and injecting the drug. Tyler's parents did everything that they knew to do and loved their son so much they would have done anything…

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Heroin Overdose is Just the Tip of Southern California’s Drug Problem

This past Wednesday, Carlie Coulter, age 22, died of a heroin overdose. She had been struggling with addiction since the age of 18. Her family is now joining with other parents out there to try to help end this surge of drug related deaths in younger people in Southern California. Heroin is becoming an epidemic in the area, not just on the streets, but among middle and upper class youngsters too. While many kids start out with prescription drugs such as OxyContin, Xanax or Klonopin, heroin offers a much cheaper high.Smokeable heroin allows users to get high without having to deal with needles. The LA County Sheriff’s office reports that there have been at least six heroin overdose deaths since August 2011. There is no word as to whether these were injectable or smokeable heroin though, or any other information on the victims. According to Cary Quashen, founder of Action Family Counseling and Action a Parent and Teen Support Program, “we've lost more than a dozen Santa Clarita kids…

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Pills to Heroin: An Increasingly Common but Deadly Path

Small towns across the U.S. are seeing an increase in heroin use. The cause is dwindling supplies of the prescription narcotic oxycodone. Oxycodone, which is sold under brand names like Oxycontin, Oxyneo, Percocet, and Percodan, is a powerful synthetic opioid derived from the papaver somniferum, or opium poppy plant. While oxycodone is legitimately prescribed for moderate to severe pain, it is also sold on the black market as a recreational drug. Powerful and addictive, regular users of oxycodone can quickly become addicted. An opiate addict becomes physically ill within hours after their last dose, prompting them to seek out more drugs to avoid withdrawal. With the rising costs of prescription drugs, users of oxycodone are turning to heroin to find a cheaper way to maintain their habits. Any drug of the opiate class can be substituted for one another to stave off withdrawal symptoms. For many, switching to heroin is simple economics. In some parts of the country, a single Oxycontin pill containing 80 milligrams of oxycodone can cost…

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Trends in Opiate Addiction Treatment

In the past decade opiate addiction has skyrocketed across the United States, with little progress in deterrence, in spite of stepped-up efforts in law enforcement. The rampant abuse of opiate based drugs (like OxyContin, Opana, Vicodin etc) is largely to blame as many young people who experiment with these drugs find themselves hooked and seeking much cheaper (and easier to acquire) heroin to ease the withdrawal symptoms. Upscale communities coast to coast have been shaken by the rash of heroin abuse in social groups of every economic status. In particular, Orange County, California, has had its share of drug offenders, but it was mostly believed that heroin (and other "hard" drugs) would never be a real problem there, at least in comparison to the epidemic facing it's neighboring Los Angeles. According to a sheriff's deputy from Orange County, a high school freshman was caught in late 2011 with dozens of heroin-packed balloons, ready for distribution. One of the difficulties in tracking just how big of a problem of heroin…

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