Controversial Fentanyl Test Strips Now Available

Many drugs that are sold on the street have been tainted with fentanyl, a powerful drug that is 80 to 100 times stronger than morphine. For some users, the tainted drug is too powerful. A controversial test strip that can test for fentanyl can save lives, but some people aren’t too excited about it. Why Test for Fentanyl? Fentanyl is taking lives faster than any drug before it, and many users accidentally ingest fentanyl when a drug is laced with it. Harm reduction advocates, who afvocate for spafe spaces and less strict drug laws, say this can save countless lives. The Fentanyl test strip technology was originally developed by a Canadian biotech company BTNX for urine drug testing. The dru strips, however, also work in liquid heroin or when a water is added to empty baggies of cocaine. In other words, it can test for the presence of fentanyl in liquids. Researchers at Johns Hopkins and Brown University determined the test strips can even detect a small amount of…

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Fentanyl and Suboxone – The Evolution of Drug Abuse and Addiction

A new and controversial detox drug utilized in major rehab centers today is buprenorphine which is better known as Suboxone. Touted as the "new methadone," this powerful, synthetic opiate is prescribed to patients with chronic pain and drug addiction problems. Ironically, both Suboxone and methadone are also addictive, just as heroin and other medications like Vicodin and Oxycotin are. Suboxone is expensive and extremely difficult to obtain from a physician. A person usually has to be a patient of a substance abuse specialist or a pain management doctor to get a prescription. The average cost for a month's prescription of Suboxone is approximately $200-$700. When used for detox purposes, gradual withdrawal of the drug is necessary to prevent negative side effects such as seizures, cramps, diarrhea, fever and chills, vomiting, and nausea. This sublingual narcotic was approved by the FDA in 2002. Rehab for Suboxone Addiction Because of the physically and psychological addictive properties of Suboxone, there are now detox and rehab clinics especially for opiate dependent patients who…

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Canadian Coroner Offers Words of Warning about OxyNEO

A recent article from CBC News out of Canada caught our eye and we wanted to share. A coroner has made a statement to health care professionals in Canada warning them that OxyContin replacement drugs (like OxyNEO) are still very dangerous and increased caution should be used in prescribing them. His statement comes as a result of an opiate overdose and in his words: “Transitioning from one opiate to another does carry some risks, and this death … highlighted the case for heightened vigilance,” Wilson said. Users May Subconsciously Seek Higher Doses of OxyNEO Wilson wanted to highlight the dangers that are inherent in switching drugs.  Many users who are not happy with the sensation of OxyNEO (or another OxyContin replacement like OxyIR or fentanyl) might prescribing physicians to clarify any questionable increases in dosage. Dr. Wilson encourages  pharmacists to screen prescriptions for patterns indicating increased dosages and to contact prescribing physicians to clarify any change. Dr. Wilson has also requested other coroners to be on alert for similar deaths.…

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